About

Hi I’m Hamish Jenkins, a multi-disciplinary designer interested in print, typography, motion & branding as well as design history & process. I’m always looking to learn and collaborate with clients and colleagues that endevour to create work which enhances people’s everyday lives in some way, big or small. If you’re interested in finding out more or want to have a chat feel free to get in touch!                       
                                                     











In the urban environment Hostile Design is used to dictate how a person can experience an object or space and who is allowed to use it. Whether it's spikes, uncomfortable benches, lighting or noises, these strategies combine to create pseudo-public spaces. This publication and poster series explores the darker side of design where seemingly innocuous objects have hostile intentions.

     
                                                                                  







       
Every year the Monash Student Association (MSA) hosts their orientation festival, a free event featuring their clubs & societies, musical acts, food and activities. For 2019 the festival was rebranded in an attempt to update and differentiate it from other events throughout the university. During this time I helped in the development of the O–Fest brand contributing to the concept development, social media assets, animation, wayfinding and signage under the art direction of the MSA Communications and Design team. 


















A hypothetical rebranding of the Festival of Questions, an annual event that invites speakers to discuss an array of topics from politics to philosophy to climate science. The branding for the festival reflects this eclectic approach to ideas and free thinking. This project was undertaken with emphasis on an unconventional process where the images were developed using objects which had been given to us during class.












Autenticos is a custom typeface based on the hand-painted signage and propaganda created during the Cuban Revolution. The typography during this era is particularly interesting because it mixes weights and borrows elements from various fonts. To emulate this I created a condensed weight, regular weight and a set of glyphs, which can be used interchangeably while retaining a cohesive feel.






 

                                                                                                                                                                     
Mark